Supplements In The News

EU bureaucrats ban selenium supplements

If you think that the health and freedom of American citizens is under attack by incompetent, power-hungry officials in the FDA and other government agencies, then you’ll really pity the poor citizens of the European Union. As more and more power is transferred from national governments to the bureaucrats of the European Union, Europeans are finding their rights being trampled on at every turn. The erosion of individual rights is especially noticeable in the supplement arena.
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Huperzine A is being studied as low-cost Alzheimer’s treatment

Huperzine A is an alkaloid found in a plant called ‘Chinese club moss’ — a plant related to the fern family. The huperzines are inhibitors of the enzyme ‘acetylcholinesterase’ which is the enzyme that deactivates the neurotransmitter ‘acetylcholine’. [pronunciation: ass-SEE-til-KOH-leen]
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Glucosamine for arthritis — why is this still controversial?

It has now been more than 20 years since the first experiments with oral glucosamine supplements showed efficacy in treating osteoarthritis. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted, some with glucosamine sulfate monotherapy, others in combination with chondroitin sulfate. Most of these studies have concluded that glucosamine supplementation ameliorates the symptoms of osteoarthritis. Yet the medical community in the U.S. is still claiming that evidence is lacking. In recent months there have been reports published purporting to show that the conclusions reached in previous clinical trials were incorrect, and that these trials really showed that glucosamine is worthless for treating osteoarthritis.

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Ginseng extract — flu protection without vaccination

With the 2004 flu season now starting, and the U.S. supply of flu vaccine cut in half, it would be nice to have a good influenza preventative that didn’t require an expensive, inconvenient visit to a physician’s office. Residents of Canada and Hong Kong have such a preventative. In Canada, at least, it is available in retail stores without a prescription. It seems to be unavailable in the U.S., however, except when ordered on-line from Canada.
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Quercetin’s anti-cancer activity is enhanced by its metabolites.

Quercetin, a flavone found in red wine, green tea, onions, and a variety of fruits and vegetables, has become an exciting nutritional supplement and is the focus of many research studies because of its anti-cancer and cardiovascular-protective effects.

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Lycopene plus vitamin E team up against prostate cancer.

Lycopene, the pigment responsible for the red color in tomatoes and other red fruits, was first shown in 1995 to have an impact on prostate cancer — i.e., higher intake of lycopene correlates with lower risk of prostate cancer. Many more studies since then have corroborated this connection and tried to reveal the reasons for it.

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Coenzyme Q10 works synergistically with vitamin E to reduce inflammation — a key factor in cardiovascular disease.

Studies of vitamin E — in cell-free systems, in tissue cultures, in animals and humans, and in whole populations — have consistently shown this vitamin’s anti-inflammatory effects and benefits in preventing cardiovascular disease. These effects jive well with theoretical concepts involving oxidation damage and unnecessary activation of the immune system.
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Chromium deficiencies translate into cardiovascular problems for diabetics.

A research study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston has shown that lower levels of chromium in the body are associated with increased cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes. Chromium appears to improve insulin sensitivity in body cells.

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Beta-glucan, bacterial infection-fighter, reveals more of its secrets.

Beta-glucan, a gummy starch-related substance found in bacteria, fungi, yeast, and plants, has been known since the 1940s to be an immune system stimulator. Research since then has shown that beta-glucan’s anti-bacterial activity involves the the binding of beta-glucan particles to certain immune-system cells — in particular, the cells known as macrophages and neutrophils. Macrophages and neutrophils migrate to the site of a bacterial infection where they use chemicals and enzymes to kill the bacteria and then destroy the resulting debris.

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Vitamin B3 consumption shows anti-Alzheimer’s effects

Vitamin B3 (niacin) is a combination of two different compounds — nicotinic acid and nicotinamide — which are interconverted in the body, and which are essential raw materials for making NAD, a cofactor for more than 200 different metabolic enzymes.
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