Supplements In The News

Popularity of CoQ10 soars on anticipated Parkinson’s Disease data

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance found in the parts of cells where energy is extracted from sugars and fats. Although cells make their own Coenzyme Q10, it has been known for some time that people who consume extra CoQ10 often feel invigorated and more energetic.

read more...read more...

Chromium picolinate counteracts fattening effects of diabetic drugs

People with diabetes who are overweight face an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other complications. But some of the most widely used anti-diabetes drugs cause weight gain. Researchers at the University of Vermont have now shown that chromium picolinate supplementation can reduce this fattening effect.

read more...read more...

Vitamin E factor shows dramatic cholesterol-lowering ability.

The term ‘Vitamin E’ refers not to just one chemical compound, but to any mixture of eight different closely related compounds. Individually these are designated ‘alpha-’, ‘beta-’, ‘gamma-’, and ‘delta-tocopherol’, and the corresponding ‘tocotrienols’.

read more...read more...

Rival dermatology factions intensify their cat-fight over Vitamin D and sun exposure.

Last year, Boston University professor Michael Holick was pressured to resign from his position in the Dermatology Department because he had written a book recommending exposure of the skin to the sun as a way to boost vitamin D levels in the body. There was no question about the fact that sunshine does cause the body to make vitamin D, or the fact that many people are deficient in vitamin D because they avoid the sun. The point of contention was simply that dermatologists had been telling people for years to avoid sun exposure because it can cause skin cancer, and the concept had become a dogma of the dermatology profession.

read more...read more...

N-acetylcysteine — a promising supplement for preventing autism

Glutathione is an antioxidant compound made in the body from three amino acids: cysteine, glutamine and glycine. In addition to its antioxidant functions, glutathione is involved in protein synthesis, amino acid transport, and in the recycling of other antioxidants, such as vitamin C.

read more...read more...

Inadequate consumption of omega-3 fatty acids during pregnancy can ruin your child’s life!

Omega-3 fatty acids — the ones that fish contain in abundance — are in the news a lot lately, and the more attention they receive from researchers, the more important they are found to be. A fairly new concept along these lines is that inadequate consumption of omega-3 fatty acids during pregnancy can cause various problems for the future child. Or to turn the argument around: fish oil consumption during pregnancy can lower your future child’s risk of developing various illnesses and shortcomings.

read more...read more...

Rosmarinic Acid reduces symptoms of hay-fever and allergic asthma.

Rosmarinic acid (RA) is an antioxidant substance found in large amounts in various plants of the mint family, such as oregano, marjoram, and sage. It has antibacterial properties that have been exploited for centuries in Asia. More recently RA’s ability to improve cholesterol profiles has attracted the attention of medical researchers.

read more...read more...

Lycopene, selenium, and vitamin E — insurance against prostate cancer

One of the body’s important antioxidants is an enzyme called MnSOD (‘manganese superoxide dismutase’). Found in the energy-extracting apparatus of each cell, MnSOD is responsible for neutralizing destructive free radicals that are produced during the metabolism of sugars and fats. It seems that about 25% of the male population has a form of MnSOD that is very sensitive to the levels of certain other antioxidants — selenium, lycopene, and vitamin E, for example.

read more...read more...

Fish oil and curcumin — dynamite for Alzheimer’s?

Fish oil is a supplement made from the fatty acids of cold-water fish. Its main components are two omega-3 fatty acids called ‘docosahexaenoic acid’ and ‘eicosapentaenoic acid’. These substances are examples of PUFAs — ‘polyunsaturated fatty acids’ — which have been much in the news lately because of their demonstrated benefits in preventing cardiovascular disease.

read more...read more...

Broccoli sprouts contain cholesterol-lowering substances.

Broccoli sprouts have been of great interest to supplement users because they contain substances called ‘sulforaphanes’, which have been shown to be effective cancer-fighters. Now these same vegetables are revealing another side: cardiovascular benefits. In particular, two research groups in Tokyo have shown that eating 100 grams (3.5 oz) of broccoli sprouts daily for just one week can measurably reduce an individual’s overall cholesterol level and increase the level of HDL or "good" cholesterol.

read more...read more...
Subscribe
To get our newsletter please enter your email address in the box below and press 'Subscribe' button.